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Dr. Jonine Biesman: Avoiding Crises Through Respectful Parenting

Photo of Dr. Biesman from theAAPN.org [Image description: Woman w/beige skin, long curly dark hair, & brown eyes, smiling widely, directly at the camera.] Dr. Jonine Biesman specializes in working with neurodiverse children and adolescents, as well as with their parents and larger family system. She is a training leader and interventionist in DIR/Floortime. We talked with Dr. Biesman about best practices for parents who need help understanding and parenting kids with aggressive or self-injurious behaviors, about presuming competence in children who need communication support, and about the potentially dangerous costs of parent-enforced compliance. Here’s what she had to say: [Best practices] doesn’t just apply to autism. With any child, whatever age, whatever person, who’s having a hard time, the first step really is understanding. What is that behavior really representing, what is it a manifestation of, and what’s really being communicated. As soon as anyone’s needs are better met,…

Disability: Considering Insider vs. Outsider Perspectives

Amanda Forest Vivian adeepercountry.blogspot.com This post was originally included in our 2011 Dialogues series. But we think it deserves separate attention, and are republishing it with the author’s permission.  —- This is just a theory, so be gentle. But I think a lot of problems between non-disabled people and disabled people might have to do with the fact that for most born-disabled people, their disability is ego-syntonic (integrated with their self-image). One! Ego-dystonic is an psych term for an aspect of a person that doesn’t fit their self-image. For example, if someone lost their legs in an accident, they would probably wake up the next day and see a body that didn’t seem to them like their real body. On the other hand, if someone is born without legs their disability is usually ego-syntonic, so they feel as attached to their body as anyone else.  They don’t feel the same…

DIR/Floortime: From Research to Practice

We were recently invited to attend the Floortime Coalition of California’s Fourth Annual DIR/Floortime® Conference: From Research to Practice, in Lafayette, California, and thought our community members might be interested in what the conference speakers had to say. (We are sharing rather than endorsing DIR-specific information.) For those unfamiliar with The DIR® Model, or Developmental, Individual-Differences, Relationship-based Model: it is “an interdisciplinary framework for assessment and intervention developed by Drs. Stanley Greenspan and Serena Wieder. It is used to guide parents and professionals in designing a program tailored to each child’s unique strengths and challenges and support developmental progress.” We live-tweeted most of the conference speakers’ talks, and collated those tweets into Storify posts for easier reading. We’ve pulled out a quote from each speaker to give a sense of their presentation. There is so much potentially useful information in these talks about rethinking parents’ roles, parent/child & therapist/client relationships,…