National Conference on Autism & Employment March 3 & 4

Announcing Autism Works – a national conference on autism and employment. The conference will be Thursday and Friday, March 3 and 4, 2011, at the Sheraton Westport Hotel in St. Louis, MO.  The conference will bring together the disability employment services community (vocational rehabilitation) and autism community to learn from each other and improve employment options for adults with autism. Topics will include: understanding the vocational rehabilitation (VR) process, what VR counselors need to know about autism, job development and work-place supports, funding possibilities for employment supports, and insights from working youth with autism.  The University of Missouri’s Disability Policy and Studies office, along with Integrated Behavioral Systems, is presenting this national conference. Registration rates and info: $205 2 Day $125 1 Day $180 2 Day Student Rate $105 1 Day Student Rate Agenda [PDF]: dps.missouri.edu/Autism/FBimages/AWAgenda.pdf  Website: dps.missouri.edu/Autism.html?cmpGAS  Facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/Autism-Works/136057253090452  Articles from the conference: Is Short-Term Job Coaching Practical…

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For the 85% of Us Who Can’t Work

Clay http://cometscorner-clay.blogspot.com I can’t say I’m surprised to learn that most autistics have a great deal of difficulty getting, and maintaining a job for more than six months. I believe it, because I know just how hard it has been for me. I saddled myself with a wife and two kids before I even got out of the Navy, and for quite a while, the subject of my wife getting a job wasn’t even discussed, because our generation wasn’t much into that. Instead, I took whatever job I could get, starting as a low paid parts clerk, until I accepted my stepfather’s offer of helping me get a job at an iron ore mine, (which paid much more). After I recovered from a huge accident, I returned and worked there for another three years. They gave me some hard and nasty jobs for awhile, such as wrestling with 55 gallon…

Being Employed With Asperger’s Syndrome

Michael V. Drejer twitter.com/maialideth When I was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome in 2003 at the age of 25, I had already pretty much given up hope of ever finding and getting a job that was right for me. All I had to show for my job skills was a high school diploma with a lousy grade average, and a few exams which I barely passed when I tried studying to become a school teacher and when I tried getting a bachelor degree in English at the university, neither of which I finished. Apparently it is difficult for people with Asperger’s syndrome to get a job or keeping a job, which was exactly what I had experienced as well. Fortunately, it does not have to be like that. In fact, hiring “aspies” for certain niche jobs can be of a great mutual advantage both for the aspie and for the company…