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Carol Greenburg and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month. Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope.  Today we’re talking with rapier-witted TPGA editor Carol Greenburg, who among her many talents gets every Star Trek references we lob at her. Do you have a website? My company’s website is www.nyspecialneedsconsulting.com What would you like a one-sentence description of yourself to say? Tiny, powerful and a trip and a half. (You can tell I’m autistic because I…

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Julia Bascom and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope. Today we’re talking with Julia Bascom, a frequent contributor to Shift Journal and the powerhouse behind the Loud Hands Project. What is your name? My name is Julia Bascom. Do you have a website? juststimming.wordpress.com What would you like a one-sentence description of yourself to say? I am not a word/I am not a line/I am not a girl…

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Lorie Johnson and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope. Today we’re talking with Lorie Johnson, who says this five-leaf clover from her garden is “as rare a mutant as I am.” What is your name and age? My name is Lorie Johnson, and I’m 51. Do you have a website? sunfell.wordpress.com What would you like a one-sentence description of yourself to say? World wandering Philosopher-Geek and autotelic Aspergian…

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Emma and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope. Emma‘s mom Ariane Zurcher writes, “Emma was unable to answer most of these questions. Of the few she did answer verbally or by typing, I have put in quotation marks. For the others I found a combination of photographs and audio to accompany the questions. I answered a couple of the questions with my own thoughts, which are not…

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Zoey Roberts and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope.  Today we’re talking with Zoey Roberts, a proud Canadian with social media superpowers, especially on Facebook. Do you have a website? www.spectrumtimes.blogspot.com What would you like a one-sentence description of yourself to say? I am unique and special! Do you have any autistic superpowers? What are they? My Autistic superpowers are creativity, gab, art, computer skills on the software…

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Alexander Cheezem and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope. Today we’re talking with Alexander Cheezem of aspieperspective.blogspot.com. Do you have any autistic superpowers? What are they? No. I have a variety of abilities, many of which are related to my (autistic) cognitive style … but I think that regarding them as “superpowers” is silly and more than a bit immature. Besides, there’s a more sinister aspect to that…

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Emily Willingham and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope. Emily Willingham is our Science Editor, and also the parent of TPGA contributor TH. What is your name? Emily Willingham Do you have a website? Yes. Science editor at TPGA, managing editor at Double X Science. What would you like a one-sentence description of yourself to say? I am a compulsive writer and critical and lateral thinker always far…

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Rina and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope. Today we’re talking with Rina, who realized she was autistic after she read The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time — without knowing the subject matter — in December of 2006. Says Rina, “I had a major epiphany while reading the book, especially the realization of why I was bullied so badly in junior high. It was…

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Brooke and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope. Because our goal is to show autistic adults and kids being their own awesome selves, today we’re going off-script so we can best feature Brooke — whose mom Jess describes her thusly: “She is a nine year-old girl whose laughter starts at her shoulders, takes her entire body along for the ride, then sets the room ablaze in light.…

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Lydia Wayman and Autism Acceptance Month

We’re featuring “Slice of Life” conversations with Autistics of all ages — kids through adults — throughout April’s Autism Acceptance Month Our goal is to help TPGA readers understand that autistic people are people who have interesting, complicated lives and who are as diverse and varied as any other population united by a label. We are the people in each other’s neighborhoods, and the more we know about each other — the more visible autistic people and children are — the more common autism acceptance will be. That is our hope. Today we’re talking with Lydia Wayman, a 24-year-old who loves friends, Diet Mountain Dew, and cats. She is greatly looking forward to a part time job and her forthcoming service dog, Lexie. She has a vast preference for communicating via text but has found a greater toleration for speech lately. What is your name? Lydia Wayman. Do you have…