NAS Professional Conference 14: Dr. Roy Richard Grinker

NAS Professional Conference 14: Dr. Roy Richard Grinker Storify by Shannon Rosa Wed, Mar 05 2014 20:21:36 Edit NAS Professional Conference 14: Dr. Roy Richard Grinker A compilation of live tweets from Dr. Grinker’s presentation The Cultural Origins and Futures of Autism Spectrum Disorders, at the National Autistic Society’s Professional Conference 2014 in Harrogate, UK. Any errors or omissions are my own. -SR Shannon Rosa@shannonrosa Dr. Grinker’s work centers on #autism, but from an anthropological perspective. Especially focusing on culture & perception. #NASprof14 Tue, Mar 04 2014 11:49:36 ReplyRetweetFavorite Shannon Rosa@shannonrosa Dr. Grinker’s #autistic daughter is now 22 years old. #NASprof14 Tue, Mar 04 2014 11:51:37 ReplyRetweetFavorite Shannon Rosa@shannonrosa We know very little about autism internationally, yet there is a wave of #autism awareness around the world. -Roy Richard Grinker #NASprof14 Tue, Mar 04 2014 11:52:19 ReplyRetweetFavorite Shannon Rosa@shannonrosa Traditional healers in South Africa find out about #autism the same…

NAS Professional Conference 14: Dr. Stephen Tyler on Severe Challenging Behaviour

NAS Professional Conference 14: Dr. Stephen Tyler Storify by Shannon Rosa Wed, Mar 05 2014 21:04:31 Edit NAS Professional Conference 14: Dr. Stephen Tyler A compilation of live tweets from Dr. Tyler’s presentation Severe Challenging Behaviour: Impact, Perceptions and Support at the National Autistic Society’s Professional Conference 2014 in Harrogate, UK. Any errors or omissions are my own. – Shannon Rosa@shannonrosa Listening to Dr. Stephen Tyler on Severe Challenging Behaviour: Impact, Perceptions & Support. #NASprof14 #autism Tue, Mar 04 2014 16:19:27 ReplyRetweetFavorite Shannon Rosa@shannonrosa Stages of ignorance include: Innocence, where you’re sure you can learn. #NASprof14 Tue, Mar 04 2014 16:20:41 ReplyRetweetFavorite Shannon Rosa@shannonrosa The final stage of ignorance: You know you don’t know, other people know you don’t know, & that’s OK. #NASprof14 #autism Tue, Mar 04 2014 16:22:36 ReplyRetweetFavorite Shannon Rosa@shannonrosa “Challenging” behaviors often happen when #autistic people are caught by surprise. #NASprof14 Tue, Mar 04 2014 16:26:09…

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For Colin, on His Viral Eleventh Birthday

Shannon Des Roches Rosa  www.squidalicious.com By now you’ve probably heard of the Happy Birthday Colin effort, in which a socially isolated (though not autistic) boy’s mom created a Facebook page to cheer him up for his eleventh birthday — and the page went viral, with nearly 2 million Likes as of this writing. Colin’s mom writes: “I am Colin’s mom, I created this page for my amazing, wonderful, challenging son who is about to turn 11 on March 9th. Because of Colin’s disabilities, social skills are not easy for him, and he often acts out in school, and the other kids don’t like him. So when I asked him if he wanted a party for his birthday, he said there wasn’t a point because he has no friends. He eats lunch alone in the office everyday because no one will let him sit with them, and rather than force someone…

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Educating Autistic Students in Ghana: AACT’s Success Story

Shannon Des Roches Rosa www.squidalicious.com The Autism Awareness, Care, and Training (AACT) school in Accra, Ghana reminds me of my own autistic son’s school here in California. Both are places of peace, calm, and competence—plus the occasional whoop, shout, or “eeeee”—while students and staff radiate not just positivity but confidence. This is because students are encouraged to learn to the best of their abilities, and are appreciated for exactly who they are. AACT is a remarkable place. [image: AACT staff and students seated around a table.] It is refreshing to find an autism school anywhere in the world that focuses on helping its students gain skills and work towards greater confidence in themselves, instead of trying to make autistic kids into non-autistic kids—destroying square pegs by pounding them into round holes (to paraphrase writer and autism parent, Paul Collins). It was a delight to visit AACT, meet and interact with…

Do Me a Favor

Christine Stephan daysixtyseven.blogspot.com I don’t like to advise people. I don’t like being in a position of telling others what to do. But I am a person of strong opinions. And just this once I’d like to tell you to do something. And by “you,” I especially mean those who love and support non-speaking autistic people of all ages. I want you to promise that when you find yourself explaining to someone that you have no idea what your loved one knows or understands that you will also quickly explain that you believe he understands everything and just hasn’t yet found a way to let the world know. When you observe your loved one behaving in a way that you don’t understand and he can’t explain, promise me that you will believe that he is trying the best he can and that he is as frustrated — probably more so…

Autistic Adults: Late Diagnoses and Supported Transition: An Interview With Brent White

M. Kelter theinvisiblestrings.com Ala Costa Adult Transition Program (ACAT) is a non-profit organization serving students with developmental disabilities between the ages of 18 and 22. Its unique approach involves not only teaching vocational and living skills but neurodiversity and self-determination. Brent White, director of the program, was recently diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. I spoke with him via e-mail about the diagnosis and his thoughts on ACAT, bad therapists and more. —- M Kelter: When did you first became of aware of the autism spectrum? Did you immediately feel any sense of recognition? Brent White: I’m not sure at what point exactly I became aware of autism. I think I might have watched a news program many years ago that did a story about autism that left me with the [mistaken] impression that autism was kind of a disease that created strange feral children who didn’t love their parents. I…

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Autism Acceptance: Don’t Be on the Wrong Side of History

Shannon Des Roches Rosa  www.squidalicious.com [image: White boy with short brown hair, seen from behind, walking on a stone path in a Japanese rock garden.] You don’t want to be on the wrong side of history, do you? That’s a particularly important question to ask yourself regarding autism acceptance. It’s important for you to accept, and then help other people understand, that autistic people like my son are your fellow human beings, with your same inalienable rights to live happy and pity-free lives. That whatever their needs and abilities, autistic people are not “less” than other people. You can start small with Autism Acceptance if you need to, start on the personal scale — taking the time to understand, for example, that my autistic son Leo doesn’t like restrictive shoes, and prefers Crocs — it’s a sensory thing. Why would I put him through the trauma of wearing other shoes?…

TPGA’s Updated Comment Policy

We’ve updated our comment policy. Short version: Please keep comments on topic, and please do so without making conflicts of opinion personal. We want TPGA and TPGA Facebook to be forums in which people feel comfortable discussing and debating autism topics. We do our best to moderate threads and encourage respectful disagreement. However, as we are a tiny team of volunteers, we may not be able to moderate in real time. If you feel we have missed a moderation opportunity, please notify us at thinkingautism@gmail.com. The main part of our updated commenting policy is below. The full TPGA comment policy can be found at www.thinkingautismguide.com/p/community-guide.html, and is also linked in our website’s header as (wait for it) Comment Policy. —- The purpose of Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism is to share and discuss information from Autistics, professionals, and parents, as guided by our Mission Statement. We encourage an ongoing dialogue…